Final Cut Pro X 10.1

It’s finally been released, alongside the new Mac Pro.  Shipping times for the Mac Pro have quickly slipped from December to January and now February.  Apple tends to under-promise with delivery estimates, but this isn’t good news for anyone hoping to get the boxes installed by the end of the year for tax purposes.

A flood of information is now available about FCPX 10.1, and the best roundup I’ve found is located at Alex Gollner’s blog.  I look forward to digging into all the resources out there, but I have a few thoughts based on what I’ve gleaned so far:

  • Apple backtracks on the Event/Project paradigm. Having your source material and edited projects in two distinct locations didn’t make sense to a lot of people, and Apple has come up with Libraries as an answer.  Libraries are centralized locations that hold all pieces of a particular job.  I’ve been using SAN Locations on an Xsan, which is functionally very similar (SAN Location = Library for the most part), so much so that Apple has removed SAN Locations from 10.1.  Also gone is the sliding-left-and-right Project Library, a piece of eye candy I’m happy to do without. It is worth noting that Libraries are packages and not folders.  Double clicking on them in the Finder will launch FCP, and not show you the contents inside.
  • Mavericks is a requirement to install Final Cut Pro 10.1.  If you have FCP 10.0.x installed and are not seeing the new release in the Mac App Store, you’re probably still running Mountain Lion or earlier.  Click the “Show Incompatible App Updates” text link and FCP should appear. Releasing 10.9 Mavericks for free was an attempt to reduce the barriers of entry and get as many people current as possible.  There are also technical underpinnings in Mavericks that the new FCP takes advantage of.  People on older gear or those who can’t upgrade for other reasons will have to sit this one out for a while.
  • Some FCP7 features are back and have been improved upon.  In “classic” FCP, you had colored indicators on clips when a shot was duplicated in your timeline.  FCP 10.1 appears to tag the sections of your source material that have been used already, so you don’t have to cut the clip in to see if it already lives somewhere else.  There are other niceties like “through edits” (a visual indicator that shows when you’ve added a cut to a continuous piece of footage) and audio-only transitions.  Oh, and Fit to Fill is back!  Thank you.
  • Skeuomorphism continues its retreat.  The default “linen” background is now a slate grey (or is that space grey?) and the clip icons have a less rounded feel.  Overall it feels more “Pro” in its look.

This is the most significant update to Final Cut in well over a year, and paired with the new Mac Pro it will make for a very interesting 2014.

Behind the scenes of The Shining, fictionally

Watch it here.

Siri Bunford created this amazing spot for Channel 4′s Stanley Kubrick Season, which gives a fictional, behind-the-scenes look at the production of The Shining. The commercial is done in one continuous gliding shot that explores the “back alleys” of the shoot, glimpsing many of the memorable characters and props from the film. The music and the pacing though still give off the creepy vibe of the film, which is what really makes this a true gem.

Absolutely incredible.

FCPX and breaking with the past

As FCP7 continues its long slow march into the sunset, I still find myself using it for one crucial task: creating HDCAM masters.  I’ve been editing in FCPX, exporting master ProRes files, and dropping them into a Final Cut Pro 7 sequence (with color bars and countdown slates) for delivery to tape.  It works, but it’s just one more hoop to jump through.

With the impending release of the new Mac Pro running Mavericks, I’ve been wondering just how well FCP7 will perform on it.  Back in 2011 Apple promised support for 7 in Lion, but has not extended that support for Mountain Lion or Mavericks in the years since.  It’s also worth noting that with OS X 10.9 Mavericks Apple has deprecated the QuickTime APIs that Final Cut Pro 7 relies on.  What does it mean to be deprecated?  Here’s Apple to explain:

From time to time, Apple adds deprecation macros to APIs to indicate that those APIs should no longer be used in active development. When a deprecation occurs, it is not an immediate end of life to the specified API. Instead, it is the beginning of a grace period for transitioning off that API and onto newer and more modern replacements.

As a developer, it is important that you avoid using deprecated APIs in your code as soon as possible. At a minimum, new code you write should never use deprecated APIs. And if you have existing code that uses deprecated APIs, you should update that code as soon as possible

So the writing is on the wall, but in the meantime there are plenty of editors who still need to deliver “legacy” videotape to their customers.  Here are a few solutions I’ve been considering:

  • Keep one legacy Mac on the network running 10.7 and FCP7, and feed final QuickTime files to it to go to tape.
  • Use the third party app that ships with the capture card (or Thunderbolt box) I’m using for capture and output now.  I’ve been testing Blackmagic’s Media Express and it’s pretty solid.
  • Hope my clients stop asking for tapes.

I’m kidding about that last point, but only a little.  Among my customers there’s really only one network that still asks for tape, and they are talking seriously about going all file-based delivery in 2014.