Yesterday was a big day for Adobe. They announced the 2019 iteration of their Creative Cloud suite of software, an upcoming iPad version of Photoshop, and an in-development drawing app codenamed Project Gemini.

Tucked away in the list of updates is a new, slimmed down version of Premiere, called Premiere Rush. It’s available across platforms (iOS, Mac, Windows) and upon first glance it bears a strong resemblance to iMovie and Final Cut Pro X. Adobe is positioning Rush in a low key way, gearing it toward casual video makers and social media content creators. But I think there’s more going on here.

One bit of criticism occasionally aimed at the full version of Premiere Pro is the notion that the software is built upon decades of legacy code. It’s filled with features and options (arguably too many) while it holds onto links to the past like videotape ingest and output.

Rewriting an application from scratch is no joke, and it’s virtually impossible to do so all in one fell swoop without cutting way back on features and focusing on a key set of functionality. Look no further than the transition from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X back in 2011 for a case study on that.

But…what if Adobe is taking on the strategy of creating a FCPX-like application alongside its “legacy” version? They can continue to release feature updates to Premiere Pro while working on the stability, functionality, and usability of Premiere Rush. Eventually the two converge in more ways than they differ and become one unified application.

It’s so crazy it just might work.

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