Adobe’s Premiere Strategy

Yesterday was a big day for Adobe. They announced the 2019 iteration of their Creative Cloud suite of software, an upcoming iPad version of Photoshop, and an in-development drawing app codenamed Project Gemini.

Tucked away in the list of updates is a new, slimmed down version of Premiere, called Premiere Rush. It’s available across platforms (iOS, Mac, Windows) and upon first glance it bears a strong resemblance to iMovie and Final Cut Pro X. Adobe is positioning Rush in a low key way, gearing it toward casual video makers and social media content creators. But I think there’s more going on here.

One bit of criticism occasionally aimed at the full version of Premiere Pro is the notion that the software is built upon decades of legacy code. It’s filled with features and options (arguably too many) while it holds onto links to the past like videotape ingest and output.

Rewriting an application from scratch is no joke, and it’s virtually impossible to do so all in one fell swoop without cutting way back on features and focusing on a key set of functionality. Look no further than the transition from Final Cut Pro 7 to Final Cut Pro X back in 2011 for a case study on that.

But…what if Adobe is taking on the strategy of creating a FCPX-like application alongside its “legacy” version? They can continue to release feature updates to Premiere Pro while working on the stability, functionality, and usability of Premiere Rush. Eventually the two converge in more ways than they differ and become one unified application.

It’s so crazy it just might work.

2018 iPad Pro rumors are afoot

Apple is expected to announce a refresh of the iPad Pro line this month, and Guilherme Rambo at 9to5Mac has an exclusive look at some of the new features:

The new iPad Pros will have an edge-to-edge display and will not feature a Home button, much like the iPhone. Unlike the iPhone, however, the iPad Pro will not have a notch.

Even though the new 2018 iPad Pro models will sport thinner bezels, those bezels will still be wide enough to accommodate the TrueDepth camera system necessary for Face ID.

Rambo also claims that the 2018 Pro will have a USB-C port that can output video to external displays, as well as a new Apple Pencil and a few other interesting bits.

iOS 12.0.1 is here, and the “.?123” key returns to its proper place

Apple has released the first point update to iOS 12.

iOS 12.0.1 includes bug fixes and improvements for your iPhone or iPad. This update:

  • Fixes an issue where some iPhone XS devices did not immediately charge when connected to a Lightning cable
  • Resolves an issue that could cause iPhone XS devices to rejoin a Wi-Fi network at 2.4GHz instead of 5GHz
  • Restores the original position of the “.?123″ key on the iPad keyboard
  • Fixes an issue where subtitles may not appear in some video apps
  • Addresses an issue where Bluetooth could become unavailable

For information on the security content of Apple software updates, please visit this website: https://support.apple.com/kb/HT201222

I’m glad I’m not the only one who kept mistakenly hitting the emoji key after iOS 12 arrived.

Happy Mojave Day

With all the iPhone and iOS news of the past few weeks, you’d (almost) be forgiven if you didn’t notice that today Apple released a major update for that other little platform they support: the Mac. I found Jason Snell’s writeup at Six Colors to be insightful:

macOS Mojave is an update that straddles the line between past and future. It feels very much like the first era of Mac OS X has drawn to a close. What comes next will almost certainly be informed by the success of iOS and powered by apps that got their start on that platform. It’s entirely possible that in five years, Macs will have touchscreens and run on Apple-designed processors. Whatever the details, the Mac has begun to turn into whatever it will be for the next phase of its life.

An iOS update that’s actually faster on older devices

Apple has pushed back against the notion of forced obsolescence with the latest version of iOS. Andrew Cunningham, reporting for Ars Technica:

…iOS 12 is a convincing counterargument to the theory that Apple intentionally hobbles its old devices to force people to buy new ones. In addition to running more like iOS 10 did, it supports devices going all the way back to 2013, which sets a new record for iOS’ software support window. Given their age, these phones and tablets feel reasonably good in everyday real-world use, including browsing, emailing, and using most apps.

I’m still rocking an iPhone 6 (I know, don’t judge- my kids get braces instead) and I can say the performance improvement is noticeable. Podcasts is my go-to app on my commute and I no longer have to wait 10-15 seconds after launch to actually play anything.